Selecting Your Kit

 

Kits come with a head, legs and arms.  In addition, you need to purchase a cloth body, neck ring - so that the head can turn, and plugs so that the weighting in the limbs won't drain into the body over time. I spend hours looking at kits.  For me, the most important things I look for is how realistic and peaceful the kit is.

 

For my collection, I prefer kits that have lots of character. I like the dolls I sell to be angelic looking.  I tend to stay away from the kits of the babies that are sad or crying or look unhappy.

 

You can see in this example that while the accuracy of the face and limbs is fantastic, without skin tone, mottling or lip color, the kit looks almost creepily unnatural.

 

There are hundreds of different kits out there.  Generally there are two types, those where a clay prototype has been sculpted by an artist and then reproduced as a vinyl kit and those where the prototype has been 3D printed from photos of a real baby - which is called a 'Realborn® doll'. 

 

Here is a picture of the real Logan, upon which this above kit was made. Once a kit has been sculpted and reproduced, the manufacturer will give the first vinyl kit to a 'Prototype Artist', who will create the first pictures of what professional reborned doll of that particular kit might look like.  Click below to see several different artist renditions of the Realborn® Logan kit from above.

 

In additional to the traditional newborn and very young baby kits that I like to paint, there are several other types that people like to reborn, including some that are very unusual.  Click here to see.

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There are hundreds of different kits out there.  Generally there are two types, those where a clay prototype has been sculpted by an artist and then reproduced as a vinyl kit and those where the prototype has been 3D printed from photos of a real baby - which is called a 'Realborn® doll'. 

Come Find us on

Come Find us on
Come Find us on

Come Find us on

Come Find us on